Beware of the Conspirosphere

The “Q Web”, by Dylan Louis Monroe

I’ve been fascinated by conspiracy theories, true and false, and over the years I’ve read quite a number of them. Unfortunately, in these strange times, many people have spent far too much of their time “going down rabbit holes” and sharing unreliable information.

There’s a great French word for the collection of Internet sites that spread this sort of misinformation: la complosphère, which I’ve translated as the Conspirosphere.

The Conspirosphere is the collection of Internet sites which copy lurid allegations that are unverified and mostly false. Truly “fake news”.

Sadly, some people believe that when something is “in print”, such as written in a salacious self-published memoir of a woman who claims to have been forced into sex slavery by nefarious forces in the US government, no less, that it must have really happened. One woman making such claims is Cathy O’Brien, and another wrote under the pen name Brice Taylor. Both of their names are listed in the oval at the right side of the giant “Q Web” which I’ve copied into this story for reference (designed by Dylan Louis Monroe).

I don’t believe either one of their claims. “Project Monarch” isn’t a real thing. I particularly don’t believe Brice Taylor, because Cathy O’Brien wrote in her second memoir of Taylor seeking her out to basically steal ideas from, before writing her own “recovered memories of childhood ritual abuse” memoir, which is almost unreadable because of how implausible it all is. I’m pretty sure Brice Taylor’s normal, everyday suburban Southern California upbringing was her only childhood and she wasn’t secretly being whisked away for a double life as a sex slave / “human computer” for powerful politicians.

One strange recent development, a part of the QAnon phenomenon, is that some people have stitched together all of the conspiracy theory allegations in the entire Conspirosphere into single elaborate diagrams. You can certainly Google all of the individual entries in the big map, but I’m afraid you’ll find, if you look at the reputable sources, that they don’t all link together in the ways that the Conspirosphere wants you to believe.

I believe “do your own research” works best when you look at a selection of authoritative websites, and not what you read in social media memes, web forums, YouTube videos, and self-published books. Unfortunately, there’s much, much less to QAnon than meets the eye. It’s a warmed-over disproven “baby food” conspiracy theory that I hope people snap out of sooner rather than later. The white rabbit led you nowhere, and I hope you snap out of your obsessions with sick crimes that famous people aren’t actually committing.

P.S. The author of the map I linked to has a colorized version as well as a new Bill Gates / COVID / 5G conspiracy chart, which I’m not going to link to here. I’ve been watching (at 2x speed, because I’ve already heard all these theories) a 5 hour interview with Dylan Monroe, where it’s clear he’s both completely sane, and also believes at least somewhat in most of these bizarre things he read in books and online and incorporated into his “map”.

I'm a software engineer in the Los Angeles area specializing in mobile applications and embedded systems.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store